Soy Students Penalized for Parents’ Voting Choices: MP Sparks Controversy

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These students, hailing from Soy constituency in Uasin Gishu County, will be denied access to the fund if their parents registered and voted in the neighboring Likuyani constituency, Kakamega County, during the past election

Soy MP David Kiplagat sparks controversy, excluding hundreds of underprivileged students from a Ksh 7 million bursary over their parents' voting decisions.

Soy MP David Kiplagat  has ignited controversy by declaring hundreds of underprivileged students ineligible for a Ksh 7 million bursary due to their parents’ voting choices.

These students, hailing from Soy constituency in Uasin Gishu County, will be denied access to the fund if their parents registered and voted in the neighboring Likuyani constituency, Kakamega County, during the past election.

“Let me make it clear,” Kiplagat stated at a Soy NG-CDF meeting, “none of the needy students from my constituency will benefit from the bursary fund allocation on account of their parent’s decision to vote in the neighboring constituency every general election.”

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His uncompromising stance drew sharp reactions. “Some parents are crying for the decision that is not of our own but theirs,” he asserted. “Mine is only to sympathize with the plight of their children, but if they want a bursary for their children, they should go and get it where they vote every election.”

Kiplagat’s justification hinges on voter registration data. “With my knowledge in IT,” he explained, “I went to the IEBC office in Soy constituency to check if the majority of parents applying for bursary for their children are eligible voters in his area.” To his surprise, he uncovered a significant number registered in Likuyani instead.

This revelation spurred his decision to prioritize bursary allocation, emphasizing, “The lesson I learned after going through the IEBC portal has forced me to ensure that only vulnerable students whose parents are eligible voters in my area benefit from the bursary allocation.”

Kiplagat’s actions triggered immediate criticism, raising concerns about penalizing children for their parents’ choices. Critics argue that tying education support to voting location disregards merit and perpetuates political patronage. They question the ethical implications of denying aid based on such criteria, potentially jeopardizing vulnerable children’s educational opportunities.

The MP’s stance also raises wider questions about voter enfranchisement and representation. Should geographic voting boundaries dictate access to social services and resources? Does this decision set a dangerous precedent for politicizing essential aid programs?

The controversy surrounding the Soy bursary disbursement highlights the complex intersection of politics, resource allocation, and social responsibility. Kiplagat’s decision undoubtedly sparks a crucial debate about balancing political accountability with ensuring equitable access to education for all, regardless of their parents’ voting choices

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