Cattle Rustling: A Deadly Local Sports Game?

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In 2006, Dr. Boni Khalwale,moved a bill in the parliament that sought to classify cattle rustling as a capital offense, with punishments ranging from death penalty to life imprisonment: the bill faced opposition from some Rift Valley MPs

Kithure Kindiki Cabinet Secretary of Interior and Administration of National Government.

Bandits have continued to plague the region, leaving a trail of violence and chaos in their wake. The law enforcement agencies are facing a grave threat as these bandits not only engage in heinous crimes but also employ cunning tactics that make it nearly impossible to track their movements.

One of the most concerning aspects of this crisis is the loss of police officers in the line of duty. These brave individuals, who work tirelessly to protect the community, have become prime targets for the ruthless bandits. In their bid to maintain law and order, they often find themselves caught in deadly traps set by these criminals. It has reached a point where the bandits’ actions have forced the police officers into a dire situation.

The bandits, particularly cattle rustlers, have amassed significant resources and a vast arsenal of firearms. This formidable firepower leaves the law enforcement officers at a severe disadvantage. In their desperation, some police officers have been forced to engage in a harrowing exchange – trading their firearms for food with the very bandits they are meant to apprehend. This precarious situation highlights the urgent need for a comprehensive solution.

Trans Nzoia Governor, George Natembeya, made a candid revelation during Thanksgiving prayers held in Nakuru. He boldly stated that police officers are not adequately compensated and often lack basic necessities such as food. This deficiency in resources and support puts these officers at risk and makes them susceptible to unorthodox arrangements with the bandits they are supposed to bring to justice.

The issue of banditry and cattle rustling is not new. In 2006, Dr. Boni Khalwale, the current senator of Kakamega, took a significant step to address this problem. He moved a bill in the parliament that sought to classify cattle rustling as a capital offense, with punishments ranging from death penalty to life imprisonment. The objective was clear – to send a strong message that this crime would no longer be tolerated.

However, the bill faced opposition from some Rift Valley MPs who questioned whether cattle rustling was merely a local sports game or a serious crime that demanded resolute action. The debate that ensued reflected the deep-rooted complexities surrounding this issue.

The question remains: Is cattle rustling a local sports game or a menace that must be dealt with decisively once and for all? The lives of police officers and the security of the community hang in the balance as this crucial matter continues to be debated and deliberated.

 

Story by: Jesse Abisheck

Email: abijessyshi@gmail.com

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